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The Most Common Myths About Teeth Whitening

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A lot of myths exist around whitening teeth, especially around the Internet. Such myths come with a lot of inquiries. Are there home remedies? Is whitening dangerous for your tooth enamel? Is it better to use teeth whitening toothpaste or whitening strips? If I’m trying to whiten my teeth, can I do it safely from home? We are here to solve your questions and talk about how whitening can impact your oral health!

What’s the Reason Teeth Turn Yellow?

While it’s accurate that teeth can miss some of that pearly white shine because of dark drink stains such as soda, tea or coffee, this is readily removed with routine brushing or at your usual trip to the dentist if it’s gotten a little out of hand! The most prevalent cause of yellow teeth happens beneath the surface. Under the outside cover of enamel is a yellow core named dentin.

As the enamel diminishes from grinding teeth, acidic foods, scuffs and normal aging, your yellowy layer gets nearer to the outside, presenting teeth that appear more yellow. Genetics play a big role in the yellowness of the dentin, or slimness of your enamel as well.

Should I get my teeth whitened professionally?

Whitening by professional seems like a strong option, but Doctors strongly advise against this if you’re looking for lasting effects that don’t require hundreds of dollars. Professional whitening utilizes 25-40% hydrogen peroxide with a kind of laser or light that companies claim speeds up or activates the whitening proceedings.

However, most research records that there aren’t long-term advantages to these light-triggered processes. In a publication by the American Dental Association, authorities state that bleaching products professionally applied aren’t eligible any longer for the ADA seal of approval. The organization highly recommends that you consult your dentist about alternatives for whitening to avoid extensive damage.

What’s the Safest Method to Whiten Teeth Then?

Doctors say the most reliable way to whiten is to apply whitening gels or strips as advised by your personal dentist and do it gradually. Bleaching your teeth extensively can create damage on enamel, but careful use shouldn’t harm your enamel.

Another myth is that utilizing a whitening gel of higher potency like you’d see in a professional hygienist’s or dentist’s office is best. Many doctors agree that using lower potency teeth whitening gels throughout several weeks gets the best returns.

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